Alden B. Abbey, who died during World War I, was buried in 1921 in a family plot at Mount Union Cemetery nearly three years after his death. His mother, Rose (Wood) Abbey, who was born and raised in the Philomath area, was buried next to him in 1934. (Photo by Brad Fuqua/Philomath News)

Published as it appeared on Jan. 16, 1918, in the (Eugene) Morning Register, Page 7, Column 4.

PERSHING SENDS DEATH LIST
———
WASHINGTON, Jan. 15. — The deaths of 37 members of the American expeditionary forces from natural causes and accidents were reported to the war department today by General Pershing. They include:

Private Clarence M. Albert, infantry, January 9, pneumonia; Colbert, Wash.

Private Alden B. Abbey, engineers, January 11, measles and pneumonia; Elk City, Ore.

Private Clifford D. Brown, ammunition train, January 11, measles; Pinedale, Wyo.

Private Gerald D. Barrett, engineers, December 31, killed by train; Portland, Ore.

Published as it appeared on Jan. 17, 1918, in the Weekly Gazette-Times (Corvallis), Page 1, Column 3.

TWO KNOWN
TO CORVALLIS
DEAD IN FRANCE
———
O.A.C. STUDENT IN 1917, AND
OTHER FORMER RESIDENT
OF THIS CITY
———
ALDEN ABBEY AND GERALD
BARRETT VICTIMS OF DIS-
EASE AND ACCIDENT
———
Two young men well-known in Corvallis are dead in France, one a victim of measles and pneumonia, the other some sort of train accident.

These boys are Alden D. Abbey, born and raised in Corvallis, but for several years of Elk City, and the other Gerald Barrett, of Portland, but for two years a student at O.A.C., having enlisted at the close of school last June.

Abbey is a son of Richard Abbey, and a cousin of John F. Allen. He was probably 27 or 28 years of age, spent his early youth in Corvallis, and a few years ago came from Elk City and spent a winter with Mr. Allen. He had been in Corvallis frequently and will be remembered by many.

Published as it appeared on Jan. 18, 1918, in the Lincoln County Leader, Page 2, Column 3.

ALDEN ABBEY DIES
“SOMEWHERE” IN FRANCE

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Abbey, of Elk City, received word the first of the week that their son, Alden, had died of pneumonia, which followed an attack of measles. Alden entered the U.S. Engineering Corps last Summer and in the Fall was sent to France.

Alden Abbey was about 25 years of age and had spent most of his life on the baby, making his home with his parents at Elk City. He was very popular with the younger set, and has many acquaintances here in Toledo. He was a member of the Odd Fellows, belonging to Toledo lodge No. 109. He attained that honor, which is the highest that mortal man can attain, he gave his life to his country.

Published as it appeared on Feb. 20, 1918, in the Oregon Daily Journal (Portland), Page 4, Column 3.

Will Not Return Bodies During War

Washington, Feb. 20 — The policy of the war department will not permit the shipment of remains of deceased soldiers to the United States until the close of the war, and the department cannot deviate from this.

General George W. Goethais, acting quartermaster general, so informs Representative Hawley, who had submitted a request from R.A. Abbey, Tillamook, Or., for return of the remains of Alden B. Abbey of the engineer corps, who died in France on January 11.

The policy was adopted on recommendations of General Pershing, it is stated, on account of difficulties in making shipments.

Published as it appeared on Jan. 3, 1921, in the Corvallis Gazette-Times, Page 1, Column 3.

ANOTHER SOLDIER’S BODY
ON WAY TO CORVALLIS

———
The body of the late Alden Abbey, Lincoln county soldier who died in France, was forwarded from Hoboken, New Jersey, on January 1, leaving that city at 12:25 a.m., and is now en route to Corvallis. Young Abbey was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Abbey of Elk City, well known in Corvallis, and was one of the first of the Benton and Lincoln county boys to give his life after the American boys arrived overseas. The funeral service is to take place in Corvallis and burial will be in Crystal Lake cemetery.

Deceased was a member of a pioneer family of this and Lincoln county. His parents are now in California where they went several months ago to remain through the winter months.

Editor’s note: The story above included incorrect information about the place of burial.

Published as it appeared on Jan. 5, 1921, in the Corvallis Gazette-Times, Page 1, Column 6.

BODY OF ALDEN ABBEY
TO REACH CITY TONIGHT

———
The remains of the late Alden Abbey, son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Abbey of Elk City, will arrive in Corvallis tonight, a telegram from the Portland quartermaster to M.S. Bovee bringing the information that the body was being forwarded from the metropolis today. Interment will be in Newton cemetery, but no arrangements for the funeral will be made until a sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Scoville, arrive from Elk City.

Young Abbey was a member of Company 6, 116th Engineers, who died overseas shortly after the landing of members of his company on foreign shores.

Published as it appeared on Jan. 7, 1921, in the Corvallis Gazette-Times, Page 1, Column 3.

Young Soldier From Overseas
To be Buried Saturday, Mrs.
Cason at Cushman Sunday
———

The funeral service over the remains of the late Alden Abbey, overseas soldier whose body has been returned to Benton county, will be held at the Bovee funeral parlors at 2 o’clock Saturday afternoon, Rev. J.P. Clyde officiating. The burial will be in Newton cemetery and there the American Legion will give young Abbey a military burial.

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